• Si Biggs

Kamerun Campaign

Unit/ Formation: Royal Marines Location: Africa Period/ Conflict: World War I Year: 1914 Date/s: 1914 - 1916 By the first week in October (1914) we had made good the country as far as Maka and the left bank of the Dibamba creek.



The Japoma railway bridge, 900 yards in length, was broken in two places, but a fine feat was performed by the French tirailleurs in forcing this passage under a galling rifle and machine-gun fire. The Royal Navy and Royal Marine Light Infantry also materially contributed to this success.


During the latter half of October the small force under Lieut.-Colonel Haywood was continuously engaged with the enemy on the line of the Northern Railway, but had made such good progress that I was in a position to arrange for an attack on Victoria, Soppo, and Buea.


As in previous operations I divided my force, part of which was moved by water to Tiko, part from Susa by Mpundu on the Mungo River, and the third portion supplied by the Royal Navy and Royal Marine Light Infantry moved by sea to Victoria.


The opposition met with cannot be described as serious, but the country was very trying to troops; the energy with which our advantage was pushed appeared to demoralise the Germans, and by the 15th November we had secured Buea, with Soppo and Victoria. We inflicted considerable casualties on the enemy whilst, escaping very lightly ourselves.


Dispatch - C. M. DOBELL, Major-General, Commanding the Allied Forces Despatches from https://www.naval-history.net

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